Tag Archives: textile exchange

5 Sustainable Fashion Stories to Read Now!

All I have to say today is—So little time, so MUCH TO READ!!!!! Fortunately, these stories are all extremely intriguing, and pleasurable to read. They highlight significant aspects of the sustainable fashion movement so get your read on!

Check it out…..

H&M + Swedish Hasbeens

The popular and philanthropic mecca that is Toms Shoes is dubbed ‘the little espadrille that could.’ (EcoSalon)

Emma Grady consults the Textile Exchange, (formerly known as the Organic Exchange) which says that global organic cotton production has increased 15% this past year. (Tree Hugger)

Another exciting designer collaboration to get your hands on—this time H&M pairs up with Swedish Hasbeens, one of Johanna Bjorks faves! (Concrete Flower)

Never wash your jeans? That just may be okay. (Ecouterre)

Amsterdam Fashion Week has begun. Look out for info on Eliza Starbuck’s entry with her amazing line Bright Young Things. (Ecco*Eco)

Bye Bye Organic Denim, Hello Sustainability

Let’s face it. Green Fashion is no longer a mystery. Like its sister initiative in organic food just a few years ago, Green Fashion is on the rise. A boundless number of eco designers, editors, advocates, and entrepreneurs, are all hard at work as they try to bridge the gap between mainstream and eco fashion. So when I came across a New York Times article entitled, “Organic Jeans Take a New Route,” I couldn’t have been more pleased.

Not only was I excited by the topic of the article, which explains how the sudden disappearance of most organic denim labels has been replaced by larger sustainability initiatives, but I was beyond thrilled that the article was in such a widely read and super credible publication like the New York Times!

NY Times writer, Alexandra Zissu, explained that while some smaller denim lines were closed out due to the recession and a crowded market, other more fortunate brands have chosen a new focus.

“Factors now being considered include water use, dye impact, soil health, labor issues, and fair trade.”

Zissu spoke with LaRhea Pepper, the senior director at Textile Exchange, a nonprofit organization that focuses on spreading the importance of organic agriculture. According to Pepper,

“There has been a paradigm shift; it’s about water, toxic waste, scrap on the cutting room floor. Across the board we see companies figuring out how to do the right thing, do it in a way that’s economically viable, move the agenda forward, and make a difference.”

In my opinion this is what the sustainable fashion and green fashion movements are all about. It’s actually nice to see and read about the redirection of the fashion industry’s green effort from the creation of solely organic denim to instead be spread across a label’s entire design platform. What do you think?

***Zissu also made it clear that while most jean companies now refrain from using organic cotton, several lines are still available at Kaight in NYC.

You can read the rest of Zissu’s article here.